Posts Tagged ‘auditd’

Stump the Chump with Auditd 01

2013-09-27 by scottpack. 1 comments

ServerFault user ewwhite describes a rather interesting situation regarding application distribution wherein code must be compiled in production. In short he wants to keep track of changes to a specific directory path and send alerts via email.

Let’s assume that there already exists some basic form of auditd in play, so as such we’ll be building out a snippet to be inserted into your existing /etc/audit/audit.rules. Ed was sparse on some of the specifics related to the application, understandably so, so let’s make some additional assumptions. Let’s assume that the source code directory in question is “/opt/application/src” and that all binaries are installed into “/opt/application/bin“.

-w /opt/application/src -p w -k app-policy
-w /opt/application/bin -p wa -k app-policy
I’ve decided to process each directory, source and binaries, separately. The commonality between the two are the ‘-w’ and the ‘-k’ options. The ‘-w’ option says to watch that directory recursively. The ‘-k’ option says to add the text “app-policy” to the output log message, this is just to make log reviews easier. The ‘-p’ option is actually where the magic happens, and is the real reason to separate these two rules out.

As we discussed in the previous post, nearly 8 months ago, the option ‘-p w’ instructs the kernel to log on file writes. One would assume this is accomplished by attaching to the POSIX system call write. That syscall, however, gets called quite a lot when files are actually saved. So as to not overwhelm the logging system auditd instead attaches to the open system call. By using the (w)rite argument we look for any instance of open that uses the O_WRONLY or O_RDWR flags. It’s worth noting that this does not mean a file was actually modified, only that it was opened in such a way that would allow for modification. For example, if a user opened “/opt/application/src/app.h” in a text editor a log would be generated, however if it was written to the terminal using cat or read using less then no log would be generated. This is pretty important to remember as many people will read a file using a text editor and simply exit without saving changes (hopefully).

We also want to watch for file writes in the binary directory except here we would expect them to be more reliable. It would be rather unusual, but not out of the question, for someone to attempt to use a text editor to open an executable. In addition we added the (a)ttribute option. This will alert us if any of the ownership or access permissions change, most importantly if a file is changed to be executable or the ownership is changed. This will not catch SELinux context changes but since SELinux uses the auditd logging engine then those changes will show up in the same log file.

Now that we have the rules constructed we can move on to the alerting. Ed wanted the events to be emailed out. This is actually quite a bit more complicated. By default auditd uses it’s own built in logger. This does make some sense when you consider the type of logging this system is intended to perform. By not relying on an external logger, like syslogd or rsyslog, it can better suffer mistaken configurations. On the downside it makes alternate logging setups trickier. There does exist a subsystem called ‘audispd’ that acts as a log multiplexor. There are a number of output plugins available, such as syslog, UNIX socket, prelude IDS, etc. None of them really do what Ed wants, so I think our best bet would run reports. Auditd is, after all, an auditing tool and not an enforcement tool. So let’s look at something a little different.

Remember how we tacked on ‘-k app-policy‘ to those rules above? Now we get to the why. Let’s try running the command:

aureport -k -ts yesterday 00:00:00 -te yesterday 23:59:59
We should now see a list of all of the logs that contain keys and occurred yesterday. Let’s look at a concrete example of me editing a file in that directory and the subsequent logs.
root@ node1:~> mkdir -p /opt/application/src
root@ node1:~> vim /opt/application/src/app.h
root@ node1:~> aureport -k

Key Report \=============================================== # date time key success exe auid event \=============================================== 1. 09/24/2013 11:41:29 app-policy yes /usr/bin/vim 1000 13446 2. 09/24/2013 11:41:29 app-policy yes /usr/bin/vim 1000 13445 3. 09/24/2013 11:41:29 app-policy yes /usr/bin/vim 1000 13447 4. 09/24/2013 11:41:29 app-policy yes /usr/bin/vim 1000 13448 5. 09/24/2013 11:41:29 app-policy yes /usr/bin/vim 1000 13449 6. 09/24/2013 11:41:35 app-policy yes /usr/bin/vim 1000 13451 7. 09/24/2013 11:41:35 app-policy yes /usr/bin/vim 1000 13450

The report tells us that at 11:41:29 on September the 24th a user ran the command “/usr/bin/vim” and triggered a rule labeled app-policy. It’s all good so far, but not very detailed. The last two fields, however, are quite useful. The first, 1000, is the UID of my personal account. That is important because notice I was actually running as root. Since I had originally used “sudo -i to gain a root shell my original UID was still preserved, this is good! The last field is a unique event ID generated by auditd. Let’s look at that first event, numbered 13446.
root@ node1:~> grep :13446 /var/log/audit/audit.log
type=SYSCALL msg=audit(1380037289.364:13446): arch=c000003e syscall=2 success=yes exit=4 a0=bffa20 a1=c2 a2=180 a3=0 items=2 ppid=21950 pid=22277 auid=1000 uid=0 gid=0 euid=0 suid=0 fsuid=0 egid=0 sgid=0 fsgid=0 ses=1226 tty=pts0 comm="vim" exe="/usr/bin/vim" subj=unconfined_u:unconfined_r:unconfined_t:s0-s0:c0.c1023 key="app-policy"
type=CWD msg=audit(1380037289.364:13446):  cwd="/root"
type=PATH msg=audit(1380037289.364:13446): item=0 name="/opt/application/src/" inode=2747242 dev=fd:01 mode=040755 ouid=0 ogid=0 rdev=00:00 obj=unconfined_u:object_r:usr_t:s0
type=PATH msg=audit(1380037289.364:13446): item=1 name="/opt/application/src/.app.h.swx" inode=2747244 dev=fd:01 mode=0100600 ouid=0 ogid=0 rdev=00:00 obj=unconfined_u:object_r:usr_t:s0
This is what we mean when we say audit logs are verbose. In the introductory blog post we discussed some of those fields so I’ll save us the pain of going over it again. What we can see, however, is that the user with uid 1000 (see auid=1000) ran the command vim as root (see euid=0) and that command resulted in a change to both “/opt/application/src/” and “/opt/application/src/.app.h.swx“.

What we should be able to see here is that the report generated by aureport doesn’t contain everything we need to see what happened, but it does tell us something happened and gives us the information necessary to find the information. In an ideal world you would have some kind of log aggregation system, like Splunk or a SIEM, and send the raw logs there. That system would then have all the alerting functionality built in to alert an admin to to the potential policy violation. However, we don’t live in a perfect world and Ed’s request for email alerts indicate he doesn’t have access to such a system. What I would do is set up a daily cron job to run that report for the previous day. Every morning the log reviewer can check their mailbox and see if any of those files changed when they weren’t supposed to. If daily isn’t reactive enough then we can simply change the values passed to ‘-ts’ and ‘-te’ and run the job more frequently.

Pulling it all together we should have something that looks like this.

# This file contains the auditctl rules that are loaded
# whenever the audit daemon is started via the initscripts.
# The rules are simply the parameters that would be passed
# to auditctl.

# First rule - delete all -D

# Increase the buffers to survive stress events. # Make this bigger for busy systems -b 320

# Feel free to add below this line. See auditctl man page -w /opt/application/src -p w -k app-policy -w /opt/application/bin -p wa -k app-policy #/etc/cron.d/audit-report

1 0 * * * root /sbin/aureport -k -ts yesterday 00:00:00 -te yesterday 23:59:59

A Brief Introduction to auditd

2013-01-18 by scottpack. 4 comments

The auditd subsystem is an access monitoring and accounting for Linux developed and maintained by RedHat. It was designed to integrate pretty tightly with the kernel and watch for interesting system calls. Additionally, likely because of this level of integration and detailed logging, it is used as the logger for SELinux.

All in all, it is a pretty fantastic tool for monitoring what’s happening on your system. Since it operates at the kernel level this gives us a hook into any system operation we want. We have the option to write a log any time a particular system call happens, whether that be unlink or getpid. We can monitor access to any file, all network traffic, really anything we want. The level of detail is pretty phenomenal and, since it operates at such a low level, the granularity of information is incredibly useful.

The biggest downfall is actually a result of the design that makes it so handy. This is itself a logging system and as a result does not use syslog. The good thing here is that it doesn’t have to rely on anything external to operate, so a typo in your (syslog|rsyslog|syslog-ng).conf file won’t result in losing your system audit logs. As a result you’ll have to manage all the audit logging using the auditd suite of tools. This means any kind of log collection, organization, or archiving may not work with these files, including remote logging. As an aside, auditd does have provisions for remote logging, however they are not as trivial as we’ve come to expect from syslog.

Thanks to the level of integration that it provides your auditd configurations can be quite complex, but I’ve found that there are primarily only two options you need to know.

  1. -a exit,always -S <syscall>
  2. -w <filename>

The first of these generates a log whenever the listed syslog exits, and whenever the listed file is modified. Seems pretty easy right? It certainly can be, but it does require some investigation into what system calls interest you, particularly if you’re not familiar with OS programming or POSIX. Fortunately for us there are some standards that give us some guidance on what to look out for. Let’s take, for example, the Center for Internet Security Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 Benchmark. The relevant section is “5.2 Configure System Account (auditd)” starting on page 99. There is a large number of interesting examples listed, but for our purposes we’ll whittle those down to a more minimal and assume your /etc/audit/audit.rules looks like this.

# This file contains the auditctl rules that are loaded
# whenever the audit daemon is started via the initscripts.
# The rules are simply the parameters that would be passed
# to auditctl.
# First rule - delete all

# Increase the buffers to survive stress events. # Make this bigger for busy systems -b 1024 -a always,exit -S adjtimex -S settimeofday -S stime -k time-change -a always,exit -S clock_settime -k time-change -a always,exit -S sethostname -S setdomainname -k system-locale -w /etc/group -p wa -k identity -w /etc/passwd -p wa -k identity -w /etc/shadow -p wa -k identity -w /etc/sudoers -p wa -k identity -w /var/run/utmp -p wa -k session -w /var/log/wtmp -p wa -k session -w /var/log/btmp -p wa -k session -w /etc/selinux/ -p wa -k MAC-policy # Disable adding any additional rules - note that adding new rules will require a reboot -e 2

Based on our earlier discussion we should be able to see that we generate a log message every time any of the following system calls exit: adjtimex, settimeofday, stime, clock_settime, sethostname, setdomainname. This will let us know whenever the time gets changed or if the host or domain name of the system get changed.

We’re also watching a few files. The first four (group, passwd, shadow, sudo) will let us know whenever users get added, modified, or privileges changed. The next three files (utmp, wtmp, btmp) store the current login state of each user, login/logout history, and failed login attempts respectively. So monitoring these will let us know any time an account is used, or failed login attempt, or more specifically whenever these files get changed which will include malicious covering of tracks. Lastly, we’re watching the directory ‘/etc/selinux/’. Directories are a special case in that this will cause the system to recursively monitor the files in that directory. There is a special caveat that you cannot watch ‘/’.

When watching files we also added the option ‘-p wa’. This tells auditd to only watch for (w)rites or (a)ttribute changes. It should be noted that for write (and read for that matter) we aren’t actually logging on those system calls. Instead we’re logging on ‘open’ if the appropriate flags are set.

It should also be said that the logs are also rather…complete. As an example I added the system call rule for sethostname to a Fedora 17 system, with audit version 2.2.1. This is the resultant log from running “hostname audit-test.home.private” as root.

type=SYSCALL msg=audit(1358306046.744:260): arch=c000003e syscall=170 success=yes exit=0 a0=2025010 a1=17 a2=7 a3=18 items=0 ppid=23922 pid=26742 auid=1000 uid=0 gid=0 euid=0 suid=0 fsuid=0 egid=0 sgid=0 fsgid=0 tty=pts4 ses=16 comm="hostname" exe="/usr/bin/hostname" subj=unconfined_u:unconfined_r:unconfined_t:s0-s0:c0.c1023 key="system-locale"
There are gobs of fields listed, however the ones that interest me the most are the various field names containing the letters “id”, “exe” and that ugly string of numbers in the first parens. The first bit, 1358306046.744, is the timestamp of the event in epoch time. The exe field contains the full path tot he binary that was executed. Useful, since we know what was run, but it does not contain the full command line including arguments. Not ideal.

Next we see that the command was run by root, since the euid is 0. Interestingly, the field auid (called audit uid) contains 1000, which is the uid of my regular user account on that host. The auid field actually contains the user id of the original logged in user for this login session. This means, that even though I used “su -” to gain a root shell the auditing subsystem still knows who I am. Using su to gain a root shell has always been the bane of account auditing, but the auditd system records information to usefully identify a user. It does not forgive the lack of command line options, but certainly makes me feel better about it.

These examples, while handy, are also only the tip of the iceberg. One would be hard pressed to find a way to get more detailed audit logging than is available here. To help make our way down the rabbit hole of auditd let’s turn this into a series. We’ll collect ideas for use cases and work up an audit config to meet the requirements, much like what I ended up doing on this answer.

If this sounds like fun let me know in the comments and I’ll work up a way to collect the information. Until then…Happy Auditing!

There will be future auditd posts, so check back regularly on the auditd tag.