A short statement on the Heartbleed problem and its impact on common Internet users.

2014-04-11 by . 5 comments

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On the 7th of April 2014 a team of security engineers (Riku, Antti and Matti) at Codenomicon and Neel Mehta of Google Security published information on a security issue in OpenSSL. OpenSSL is a piece of software used in the encryption process; it helps you in coding your computer traffic to ensure unauthorized people cannot understand what you are sending from one computer network to another. It is used in many applications: for example if you use on-line banking websites, code such as OpenSSL helps to ensure that your PIN code remains secret.

The information that was released caused great turmoil in the security community, and many panic buttons were pressed because of the wide-spread use of OpenSSL. If you are using a computer and the Internet you might be impacted: people at home just as much as major corporations. OpenSSL is used for example in web, e-mail and VPN servers and even in some security appliances. However, the fact that you have been impacted does not mean you can no longer use your PC or any of its applications. You may be a little more vulnerable, but the end of the world may still be further than you think. First of all some media reported on the “Heartbleed virus”. Heartbleed is in fact not a virus at all. You cannot be infected with it and you cannot protect against being infected. Instead it is an error in the computer programming code for specific OpenSSL versions (not all) which a hacker could potentially use to obtain  information from the server (which could possibly include passwords and encryption keys, along with other random data in the server’s memory) potentially allowing him to break into a system or account.

Luckily, most applications in which OpenSSL is used, rely on more security measures than only OpenSSL. Most banks for instance continuously work to remain abreast of security issues, and have implemented several measures that lower the risk this vulnerability poses. An example of such a protective measure is transaction signing with an off-line card reader or other forms of two –factor authentication. Typically exploiting the vulnerability on its own will not allow an attacker post fraudulent transactions if you are using two-factor authentication or an offline token generator for transaction signing.

So in summary, does the Heartbleed vulnerability affect end-users? Yes, but not dramatically. A lot of the risk to the end-users can be lowered by following common-sense security principles:

  • Regularly change your on-line passwords (as soon as the websites you use let you know they have updated their software, this is worthwhile, but it should be part of your regular activity)
  • Ideally, do not use the same password for two on-line websites or applications
  • Keep the software on your computer up-to-date.
  • Do not perform on-line transactions on a public network (e.g. WiFi hotspots in an airport). Anyone could be trying to listen in.

Security Stack Exchange has a wide range of questions on Heartbleed ranging from detail on how it works to how to explain it to non-technical friends. 

Authors: Ben Van Erck, Lucas Kauffman

5 Comments

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  • […] a finger exercise for my new Romanian friends. The next step will be much bigger. We will use the SSL exploit in online banking and to automatically transfer money from rich bank accounts to poor peoples’ […]

  • Rose says:

    Thanks for a very clear and concise explanation of the Heartbleed problem and how it will affect everyday Internet users. Good to get information devoid of media-hype!

  • jiom eu ribann bern on sdaz de vom fe fo be na meu bem..

  • Adam says:

    Thanks for the explanation as to what this is exactly.

  • I think a lot of people create one password and use it for as many sites as they possibly can. This is so much easier than creating a dozen different passwords that are really complex and odd and trying to remember them all. But that also means that your entire online life can be hacked if someone gets their foot in the door.

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