Posts Tagged ‘data’

QoTW #51 Would it be good secure programming practice to overwrite a “sensitive” variable before deleting it?

2014-12-12 by Xander. 0 comments

Jonathan recently asked this question about secure development practices, specifically, whether it makes a difference to your application’s security if you overwrite the values of sensitive variables as soon as you’re through with them.  The rational is that if you don’t clear the variable values then there is a wider window of opportunity for a malicious party to be able to find and use the sensitive data by reading it out of RAM.

Gillesanswer explains that yes, this is important, and explains why.  There are a number of reasons, and while an attacker reading the values out of RAM is a consideration, it isn’t even one of the more important ones.

Yes, it is good practice security-wise to overwrite data that is particularly sensitive when the data is no longer necessary, i.e. as part of an object destructor (either an explicit destructor provided by the language or an action that the program takes before deallocating the object). It is even good practice to overwrite data that isn’t in itself sensitive, for example to zero out pointer fields in a data structure that goes out of use, and also zero out pointers when the object they point to is freed even if you know you aren’t going to use that field anymore. One reason to do this is in case the data leaks through external factors such as an exposed core dump, a stolen hibernation image, a compromised server allowing a memory dump of running processes, etc. Physical attacks where an attacker extracts the RAM sticks and makes use of data remanence are rarely a concern except on laptop computers and perhaps mobile devices such as phones (where the bar is higher because the RAM is soldered), and even then mostly in targeted scenarios only. Remanence of overwritten values is not a concern: it would take very expensive hardware to probe inside a RAM chip to detect any lingering microscopic voltage difference that might be influenced by an overwritten value. If you’re worried about physical attacks on the RAM, a bigger concern would be to ensure that the data is ovewritten in RAM and not just in the CPU cache. But, again, that’s usually a very minor concern. The most important reason to overwrite stale data is as a defense against program bugs that cause uninitialized memory to be used, such as the infamous Heartbleed. This goes beyond sensitive data because the risk is not limited to a leak of the data: if there is a software bug that causes a pointer field to be dereferenced without having been initialized, the bug is both less prone to exploitation and easier to trace if the field contains all-bits-zero than if it potentially points to a valid but meaningless memory location.

The accepted answer by makerofthings7 reckons that not only is this important, also lays some conditions that need to be considered.

Yes that is a good idea to overwrite then delete/release the value. Do not assume that all you have to do is “overwrite the data” or let it fall out of scope for the GC to handle, because each language interacts with the hardware differently. When securing a variable you might need to think about:
  • encryption (in case of memory dumps or page caching)
  • pinning in memory
  • ability to mark as read-only (to prevent any further modifications)
  • safe construction by NOT allowing a constant string to be passed in
  • optimizing compilers (see note in linked article re: ZeroMemory macro)

Andy Dent‘s answer has some advice for achieving this in C and C++

  • Use volatile
  • Use pragmas to surround the code using that variable and disable optimisations.
  • If possible, only assemble the secret in intermediate values rather than any named variables, so it only exists during calculations.

Lawtenfogle points out that you need to be wary of constructs like .NET’s immutable strings, and re-iterates the potential problem with optimizing compilers.

Storing a value that isn’t used again? Seems like something that would be optimized out, regardless of any benefit it might provide. Also, you may not actually overwrite the data in memory depending upon how the language itself works. For example, in a language using a garbage collector, it wouldn’t be removed immediately (and this is assuming you didn’t leave any other references hanging around). For example, in C#, I think the following doesn’t work.
string secret = "my secret data";

...lots of work...

string secret = "blahblahblah";
"my secret data" hangs around until garbage collected because it is immutable. That last line is actually creating a new string and having secret point to it. It does not speed up how fast the actual secret data is removed.

Several answers and comments also pointed out that when using a non-managed language like C or C++, when you can, you should also pin the memory in order to prevent it from being swapped to disk where sensitive values might remain indefinitely.

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QoTW #49: How can someone go off-web, and anonymise themselves after a life online?

2014-01-27 by roryalsop. 2 comments

Everything we do these days is online, whether through our own social media, purchases from online stores, tracking by google, Amazon etc., and the concept of gaining some sort of freedom is getting traction in the media, with the leaking of NSA snooping documents and other privacy concerns, so before Christmas I asked the deceptively simple question:

How can someone go off-web, and anonymise themselves after a life online?

Which ended up being the most popular question I have ever asked on Stack Exchange, by a good margin.

Lucas Kauffman supplied the top rated answer – which goes into some detail on heuristics and data mining, which is likely to be the biggest problem for anyone trying to do this successfully:

Avoiding heuristics means changing everything you do completely. Stop using the same apps, accounts, go live somewhere else and do not buy the same food from the same brands. The problem here is that this might also pop up as a special pattern because it is so atypical. Changing your identity is the first step. The second one is not being discovered…the internet doesn’t forget. This means that photos of you will remain online, messages you posted, maybe even IDs you shared will remain on the net. So even when changing your behavior it only will need one picture which might expose you.

The Little Bear provided a short but insightful message, with disturbing undertones:

You cannot enforce forgetfulness. The Web is like a big memory, and you cannot force it to forget everything about you(*). The only way, thus, is to change your identity so that everything the Web knows about you becomes stale. From a cryptographic point of view, this is the same case as with a secret value shared by members of a group: to evict a group member, you have to change the secret value. (*) Except by applying sufficiently excessive force. A global thermonuclear war, with all the involved EMP, might do the trick, albeit with some side effects.

Question3CPO looks again at statistics on your financial footprint, but with a focus on how to muddy the waters with:

When it comes to finances, it’s similar; I have to make an assumption that the data I receive are an accurate indicator of who you are. Suppose you make 1/3 or more of your purchases completely away from your interest, for instance, you’re truly a Libertarian, but you decide to subscribe to a Socialist magazine. How accurate are my data then? Also, you may change in ten years, so how accurate will my data be then, unless I account for it (and how effective then is it to have all the historic data)?

and Ajoy follows up with some more pointers on poisoning data stores:

  1. Make a list of all websites where you have accounts or which are linked to you in some way.
  2. One by one, remove your personal details, friends, etc. Add misinformation – new obscure data, new friends, new interests, anything else you can think of. De-link your related accounts, re-link them to other fake ones.
  3. Let the poisoned information stay for some time. Meanwhile, you could additionally change these details again. Poisoning the poisoned! Ensure that there is no visible pattern or link between any of the poisoned accounts.
  4. Then you could delete all of them, again very slowly.

There are quite a few other insightful answers, and the question attracted a couple of very interesting comments, including my favourite:

At the point you have succeeded you will also be someone else. –  stackunderflow

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